Outlook for Bioenergy in 2015

Bioenergy is the only renewable energy feedstock that cuts across the thermal, electrical and transportation sectors. However most experts agree that its vast potential has only just begun to be tapped. RenewableEnergyWorld.com takes a look at what’s in store for this versatile renewable energy feedstock. The article is part of the Renewable Energy World January/February Annual Outlook for 2015.

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Fuel for thought: Why ethanol should help power South Carolina

Dr. Jim Frederick, former SC Biomass Council Board Chair, discusses the myths and misconceptions about using biofuels and illustrates an economic opportunity by growing biofuels in South Carolina. Read the article here. 

 

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Carbon Debt Sequel Gets a Thumbs Down

A blog from Dave Tenny, NAFO President and CEO. Recently the media has reported on release of the sequel to the infamously flawed “carbon debt” argument, asserting that biomass energy contributes to carbon build-up in the atmosphere. The sequel gets a thumbs down by pre-eminent carbon science leaders as did the original version.

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RFA releases 2015 Ethanol Industry Outlook and Pocket Guide to Ethanol

RFA released an update to its 2015 Ethanol Industry Outlook and Pocket Guide to Ethanol. Each features in-depth looks at key topics that include the RFS, energy security, the environment, impacts on the economy, U.S. agriculture, international trade, transportation, and cellulosic technology.

Meanwhile, NASCAR celebrated its fifth year of partnership with American Ethanol. Five years ago, NASCAR made the change to an ethanol fuel blend and has run on Sunoco Green E15 since the 2011 Daytona 500. The move to Sunoco Green E15 has boosted the performance of the race cars in all three of NASCAR’s national series – lowering emissions and increasing horsepower.

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Argonne scientists criticize WRI study that casts doubts on bioenergy

Biofuels scientists from Argonne National Laboratory have offered a scathing critique of a recent study that found the world cannot meet its future food needs and produce bioenergy at the same time. In a set of comments, Argonne’s Michael Wang and Jennifer Dunn said the paper published by the World Resources Institute relied on faulty assumptions about bioenergy production, as well as ignored key studies that paint biofuels in a positive light.

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